Monday, 9 December 2019

#BlogTour Hanukkah at the Great Greenwich Ice Creamery by Sharon Ibbotson


It's the start of the BlogTour Hanukkah at the Great Greenwich Ice Creamery by Sharon Ibbotson.

About the Author
Sharon was born in Sydney, Australia but now lives in London with her husband, two small children and two black cats named for desserts. She started writing ‘Buffy the Vampire Slayer’ fanfiction aged 15, which eventually transformed into the historical romance novels she writes today. She has two novels published by Choc Lit, and when not writing, can be found baking cakes badly or drinking wine well.

Follow @seibbotson on Twitter, on Facebook, on Instagram, on Amazon, on Goodreads, Visit sharonibbotson.comBuy Hanukkah at the Great Greenwich Ice Creamery


About the book
Cohen Ford is a man who could do with a little bit of sweetening up. It’s no surprise that when he walks into The Great Greenwich Ice Creamery on a typically gloomy London day before Christmas, he insists on a black coffee rather than his childhood favourite – strawberry ice cream.

But then he meets River de Luca, the woman behind the flavours. After their first encounter, Cohen begins visiting the ice creamery every Tuesday, gradually learning more about the intriguing River. Could her influence encourage cynical Cohen to become the man who embraces Christmas, Hanukkah and even strawberry ice cream?Hanukkah days, Christmas nights and strawberry ice cream …

Review
Cohen is on an errand. The kind of annoying errand only a parent can send you on, so he certainly isn't expecting to walk into an Ice Creamery and make the kind of visceral connection that is very rare. An instant attraction - the knowledge that somehow you are meant to connect with a specific person that just happens to walk into your life.

The way Cohen talks about River to Rushi, and vice versa, in the first few chapters and in general - I found it uncomfortable. It's as if everyone in her vicinity infantilises River, because of her deafness. Talking about her over her head, making decisions about her and for her as if she were a child. It wasn't concern for her well-being, but rather an attempt to control in the name of concern.

Romanticising the behaviour felt wrong, and in a way I think the author calls attention to the attitude and behaviour of the hearing in regards to the deaf by doing this. The ignorance and arrogance that accompanies the treatment of the deaf when those who can hear find themselves in a position to have to move beyond their usual methods of communication.

The author also makes a point about how men are taught to curb and discount certain talents and things they enjoy merely because they could be seen as effeminate. Cohen is taught to feel shame and embarrassment for hobbies that bring him pleasure.

It's romance that crosses the boundaries of the senses and communication to allow love to blossom. Ibbotson combines the early blush of attraction with the physical feelings of desire, which culminate in two people acknowledging a deep connection between the two of them.

On a side note: I think sign language, obviously which kind depends on the country, should be a made a compulsory part of curriculum to create an even playing field for all individuals both hearing and non-hearing.

Buy Hannukkah at the Great Greenwich Ice Creamery at Amazon Uk or go to Goodreads for any other retailer. Publisher: Choc Lit; pub date 4 Dec. 2019. Buy at Amazon com.

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