Saturday, 3 March 2018

#BlogTour A Blindefellows Chronicle by Auriel Roe

Today it is my pleasure to take part in the BlogTour for A Blindefellows Chronicle by Auriel Roe. It is an unusual read, think quaint and quirky with a spark of nostalgia.


About the Author
Blindefellows is my first published novel and is the result of a few years' worth of quirky scribblings in a stack of notebooks. I wrote the novel I always wanted to read but couldn't find, partially inspired by my favourite authors, Stella Gibbons, PG Wodehouse and Evelyn Waugh.

In addition to my writing, I am also an artist, from ram-sized pugs to sedate still life. I add a small observation and image to my blog on a daily basis which can be found on my website

Follow @AurielRoe @unbounders Look out for #Blindefellows
Buy A Blindefellows Chronicle


About the book
At midday on 31st August, Sedgewick, the new history master, arrives at Blindefellows, former charity school for poor, blind boys, now a second division private school for anyone who can pay. The naive newcomer is quickly taken under the wing of the rumbustious, philandering Japes, master of physics, who soon becomes something of a mentor, though not in an academic sense.
A Blindefellows Chronicle follows the adventures of Sedgewick, Japes and a handful of other unmarried faculty at an obscure West Country boarding school including the closeted headmaster, Reverend Hareton, stalwart Matron Ridgeway and loathsome librarian, Fairchild.
Review
You can tell that Roe takes her inspiration from classic writers like Wodehouse. The plot reminds me of the old chums sentiment Enid Blyton was known for in her Famous Five and Mallory Towers books, but for an older audience. Think quaint, quirky and nostalgic.

The author takes us through the years 1974 to 2014, following the Blindefellows school, as it embraces modern ideas and moves forward with the times. The introduction of women as upper staff, which causes a lot of friction among the rigid and snooty tutors. The way the students embrace anarchy and stand up for their rights, albeit using stubborn four-legged woolly menaces, who like to chew on rare first edition literature. Viva la Sheep!

I have to say, although it is meant to be a light-hearted read, the author still manages to insert quite a few serious topics into the story. One of those is the class excursion to the sites of World War graveyards, memorials and battle sites. It is a poignant lesson in teaching the young men how many sacrifices previous generations made to make sure the younger generations can live their lives in peace. A subtle reminder that the tutors at the school have their own stories to tell.

The sad tone of the last chapter belies the light-heartedness of the rest, but only because the author brings the story to a conclusion with a sharp slap of reality.

Roe combines a snarky tongue in cheek sense of humour with an aura of the stiff upper lip the British are known for. Which means you get a a strange balance of real and vulnerable characters combined with seemingly absurd situations. It's this flair for the old masters that makes A Blindefellows Chronicles more than just the average story.

Buy A Blindefellows Chronicle at Amazon Uk or go to Goodreads for any other retailer.


1 comment:

  1. Thanks so much for the Blog Tour support Cheryl xx

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